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Discussion Starter #1
This may seem like an odd question.

Like many people out there in the world, I live paycheck to a couple days before paycheck. I work a full time gig and some odd jobs here and there to keep my head just below the surface. That is to say there is no fluff in the budget. In three months when I have my Heritage Classic paid off, I will have "some" fluff, not a lot. I have considered getting a Roadster when it is paid off but keeping the Heritage of course. She's a 2003 and has some custom chrome etching that I've done and I won't part with her. But she's 17 years old now and in great shape, but I want a younger bike that won't issue concerns of reliability. That being said, I love the Livewire and I'd love to own one, as would many people out there.

But how do you do that?

When most are operating on a Sportster budget (I love Sporty's by the way), how does one plunk down any amount of cash and manage paying for a big ticket item like the LW? Are people making more money than I think? Are some people better at saving money or managing what they have? Are people just saying screw it, jumping in the hole with a smile on their face and sucking up the Ferrari sized payments? What are people doing to afford this bike.

Might be a fun conversation to see how you are all doing it.

Peace and all that. Ride safely kids.
Ted
 

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This may seem like an odd question.

Like many people out there in the world, I live paycheck to a couple days before paycheck. I work a full time gig and some odd jobs here and there to keep my head just below the surface. That is to say there is no fluff in the budget. In three months when I have my Heritage Classic paid off, I will have "some" fluff, not a lot. I have considered getting a Roadster when it is paid off but keeping the Heritage of course. She's a 2003 and has some custom chrome etching that I've done and I won't part with her. But she's 17 years old now and in great shape, but I want a younger bike that won't issue concerns of reliability. That being said, I love the Livewire and I'd love to own one, as would many people out there.

But how do you do that?

When most are operating on a Sportster budget (I love Sporty's by the way), how does one plunk down any amount of cash and manage paying for a big ticket item like the LW? Are people making more money than I think? Are some people better at saving money or managing what they have? Are people just saying screw it, jumping in the hole with a smile on their face and sucking up the Ferrari sized payments? What are people doing to afford this bike.

Might be a fun conversation to see how you are all doing it.

Peace and all that. Ride safely kids.
Ted
Why would you want a Livewire? The Sporties are good bikes and way more affordable. Do you just want to help the environment and go green? Then I would look at the Zero line of bikes which start at 11k and go up. HD made a big mistake on pricing the LW so high. I've only owned Harleys so I was not turned off by the price as I've paid more for another Harley that I had. The LW is so overpriced it is not worth to buy new if you have to sacrifice other things in life. I would wait a few years and see how the used market of Livewires look.
 

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I was in school until I was 34 yr/old. For almost 15 years while my college friends were establishing themselves and making money I was in school or residency - the good thing is I had no time to play and go in debt. So when the time came for me to enter the workforce, there are very few with the training & experience, so supply/demand creates financial opportunity. I work hard and now play hard. But financial responsibility is paramount...the bike is a blast, but not enough to strain yourself. Better to invest in a retirement account so you can keep riding...and I still have a ton of fun on my Iron
 

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Howdy Theo,

Cost is a real factor for sure. As for myself, I am blessed to be at a point in my life that I have no other large debts. I also do not have children or pets. So a lot of money that the average adult might have had to focus elsewhere I can put into my hobbies. I also saved for half the cost of the bike and put that as my downpayment to lower the cost of my insurance and payments. I just worked some OT for a month with a picture of the bike on my fridge and at work in my locker so I could focus on why I was putting myself through Hell to do it. My job charges us parking, but if you drive an EV you get free parking, free charging, and it's also closer to the building so I do not have to ride a shuttle bus from off campus. Saving me a ton of time everyday coming and going. Where I live there are a lot of free parking spots for EV vehicles around town that otherwise I would have been paying to park my Jeep. So I saw it as a way to offset that expense too and at least get something out of it. These are all very unique things to where I live and work. However, if you live in any regional to large city there are similar setups from what I understand in several places.

- Jordan
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Why would you want a Livewire? The Sporties are good bikes and way more affordable. Do you just want to help the environment and go green? Then I would look at the Zero line of bikes which start at 11k and go up. HD made a big mistake on pricing the LW so high. I've only owned Harleys so I was not turned off by the price as I've paid more for another Harley that I had. The LW is so overpriced it is not worth to buy new if you have to sacrifice other things in life. I would wait a few years and see how the used market of Livewires look.
I have always said that my next bike would be the Roadster. If money were not an issue, it would be the Livewire. There are just many advantages to having one and of course many to have the Sportster as well. So likely it will be the Roadster and I'll save the LW for my dreams.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Howdy Theo,

Cost is a real factor for sure. As for myself, I am blessed to be at a point in my life that I have no other large debts. I also do not have children or pets. So a lot of money that the average adult might have had to focus elsewhere I can put into my hobbies. I also saved for half the cost of the bike and put that as my downpayment to lower the cost of my insurance and payments. I just worked some OT for a month with a picture of the bike on my fridge and at work in my locker so I could focus on why I was putting myself through Hell to do it. My job charges us parking, but if you drive an EV you get free parking, free charging, and it's also closer to the building so I do not have to ride a shuttle bus from off campus. Saving me a ton of time everyday coming and going. Where I live there are a lot of free parking spots for EV vehicles around town that otherwise I would have been paying to park my Jeep. So I saw it as a way to offset that expense too and at least get something out of it. These are all very unique things to where I live and work. However, if you live in any regional to large city there are similar setups from what I understand in several places.

- Jordan
Thanks for your input Jordan. Annual operating cost is a factor and i can see you are saving a lot. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was in school until I was 34 yr/old. For almost 15 years while my college friends were establishing themselves and making money I was in school or residency - the good thing is I had no time to play and go in debt. So when the time came for me to enter the workforce, there are very few with the training & experience, so supply/demand creates financial opportunity. I work hard and now play hard. But financial responsibility is paramount...the bike is a blast, but not enough to strain yourself. Better to invest in a retirement account so you can keep riding...and I still have a ton of fun on my Iron
Go Sporty!!!
 
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