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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After 3 months of ownership and only 300 miles of riding due to ‘lock-downs’, my live wire has totally failed. Dead as a dodo. So back to the dealer, but they are still talking tomHD head office. Has anyone else had these issues? Any thoughts or colour appreciated.
 

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After 3 months of ownership and only 300 miles of riding due to ‘lock-downs’, my live wire has totally failed. Dead as a dodo. So back to the dealer, but they are still talking tomHD head office. Has anyone else had these issues? Any thoughts or colour appreciated.
From what you described it seems like the 12v battery failed. It is a common problem on the LW and it is a weak point of the bike. Your dealer should know that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
From what you described it seems like the 12v battery failed. It is a common problem on the LW and it is a weak point of the bike. Your dealer should know that!
I did wonder about that and I asked upon purchase and was told by the dealer that when on main charge it also takes care of the 12v battery, but maybe not?
 

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I did wonder about that and I asked upon purchase and was told by the dealer that when on main charge it also takes care of the 12v battery, but maybe not?
The sole purpose of the 12v battery is to turn on the computers and have the bike ready when you hit the start button. So if you hit the run button and nothing lights up and nothing on the display the 12v is dead. Yes the RESS does charge the 12v battery but as I said above the 12v battery has been failing on numerous bikes.
 

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So, I just discovered that if I edit a post multiple times, it disappears and gets held for moderation (which seems to never happen). So to work around that, reposting it again, here, without re-reading it and getting the temptation to edit and expand it ;)

Step 1) remove your 12v battery. It's under the bike, in a compartment with a door held-on with a single T27 Torx screw. Charging in-situ on the bike is possible but definitely not wise due to how the voltage affects things*. Unscrew at least one terminal before connecting the charger.

Step 2) charge the 12v battery at 2 amps for 1 hour, or at 1 amp for 2 hours. It's a tiny little 2Ah battery. It'll come back to life pretty quick, and since it's lithium, it (not literally, but effectively) won't ever need to be replaced - just recharged.

Step 3) screw the battery back into the bike. The bike ought to spring to life as if nothing happened.

Step 4) Ride on!

* - If you're charging it in-situ on the bike, you'll need to use a BIG battery charger (10 amp spec, or a minimum of 5 amp) to get it started without issues. The problem is, the bike immediately tries booting-up when the 12v comes back to life, which it does when you start charging it. That takes a bunch of power and keeps it from charging the actual battery (the charger is instead powering the bike, until it can fully boot and power itself). If it tries starting and you have a smaller charger, it will likely set faults that will keep the bike from starting/running even after you charge the 12v battery. So it's always best to just disconnect the battery before trying to revive it (and that also means - battery maintainers are great to keep it from going dead, but if it's already dead, DO NOT plug a battery maintainer in to try reviving it - it'll just cause problems!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So, I just discovered that if I edit a post multiple times, it disappears and gets held for moderation (which seems to never happen). So to work around that, reposting it again, here, without re-reading it and getting the temptation to edit and expand it ;)

Step 1) remove your 12v battery. It's under the bike, in a compartment with a door held-on with a single T27 Torx screw. Charging in-situ on the bike is possible but definitely not wise due to how the voltage affects things*. Unscrew at least one terminal before connecting the charger.

Step 2) charge the 12v battery at 2 amps for 1 hour, or at 1 amp for 2 hours. It's a tiny little 2Ah battery. It'll come back to life pretty quick, and since it's lithium, it (not literally, but effectively) won't ever need to be replaced - just recharged.

Step 3) screw the battery back into the bike. The bike ought to spring to life as if nothing happened.

Step 4) Ride on!

* - If you're charging it in-situ on the bike, you'll need to use a BIG battery charger (10 amp spec, or a minimum of 5 amp) to get it started without issues. The problem is, the bike immediately tries booting-up when the 12v comes back to life, which it does when you start charging it. That takes a bunch of power and keeps it from charging the actual battery (the charger is instead powering the bike, until it can fully boot and power itself). If it tries starting and you have a smaller charger, it will likely set faults that will keep the bike from starting/running even after you charge the 12v battery. So it's always best to just disconnect the battery before trying to revive it (and that also means - battery maintainers are great to keep it from going dead, but if it's already dead, DO NOT plug a battery maintainer in to try reviving it - it'll just cause problems!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow.... awesome reply, my next thought would have been to rig up a trickle charge.... so thank you! I Just want her and my sportser cafe racer back on the road for when the UK opens up. Thank you
 

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It's also worth noting that IN THEORY (in design), the bike is supposed to be monitoring that 12v battery "in its sleep" and wake itself up to recharge it if it notices the battery getting too low. It's sort of like a bike that can automatically start its engine and refresh itself while it's in your garage for the winter - except because it's all electronic, that's a lot easier to do. Strangely, that doesn't seem to always be the case. I see no harm in just keeping a maintainer plugged-in to the battery to keep the bike's dreams powered by wall power instead of that dinky little 2Ah / 12v battery.

Just don't try restoring a dead 12v battery with a 12v battery maintainer, unless you disconnect the battery from the bike first. :)
 

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Just wanted to jump in and say I had this happen to me. I just jumped the 12v off of my car, and immediately removed it once the main contactor came in, (which would charge the 12v battery off the RESS).

This isn't really advice, I want to make that clear, but this is my 4th electric vehicle, and the 3rd I've had to jump the 12v battery. Because the 12v doesn't need to crank an engine, they can be very small, but that means it has very little tolerance to f*ck ups in discharging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
And again….. this is after about 4 weels without use due toma holiday , and the last fault taking over 7 weeks for the UK dealer to sort out (clearly it wasn’t). She’s dead again, so, I took the old fashioned fossil fuelled trickle charged sportster out. The whole issue of life these days is I want my toys to be reliable, which I think for £30k for a livewire is a fair expectation. I should not have to mess with it and waste an time on jump starting a nearly new Harley on my rare moments of time off. I’ll see what the dealer says, but I‘m starting to wish we had lemon law here in the UK as I worry I can see where this is going……and I’m think maybe it’s time for another (petrol powered) Ducati!! ….. it’s an amazing vehicl, but if its can’t be made reliable I’m done!
 

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And again….. this is after about 4 weels without use due toma holiday , and the last fault taking over 7 weeks for the UK dealer to sort out (clearly it wasn’t). She’s dead again, so, I took the old fashioned fossil fuelled trickle charged sportster out. The whole issue of life these days is I want my toys to be reliable, which I think for £30k for a livewire is a fair expectation. I should not have to mess with it and waste an time on jump starting a nearly new Harley on my rare moments of time off. I’ll see what the dealer says, but I‘m starting to wish we had lemon law here in the UK as I worry I can see where this is going……and I’m think maybe it’s time for another (petrol powered) Ducati!! ….. it’s an amazing vehicl, but if its can’t be made reliable I’m done!
Did you try jumping the 12v battery? It only needs enough juice to kick in the RESS contactor which will then charge the 12v battery.

Do you store it with the keys near it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I haven’t…. She’s only 1 yr old and got her first Service 4 was ago…. I kinda feel like imshouldnt have to keep jump starting it ….. but I domt know if I can rig up a trickle charger on the 12v battery like I do with my other vehicle for if I’m. Or going to use her for a coupl of weeks, but honestly my whole frustration is that leaving her plugged in was supposed to top up drive battery and the 12v.
Out of interest, what difference does keeping the keys near her make? I’d never even though about it, bike is in the detached garage…. Keys are in the house - interested in your thoughts here NoRemorse.
thx!
 

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I had three batteries replaced before they discovered an intermittent issue with the On Board Charger. It was not until the dealer experienced the battery go dead overnight that HD finally approved replacing the OBC. I did see what looked like an error with the OBC via diagnostics but when it got to the dealer and they put a new battery in it there were no errors and it was charging. I can't say for sure replacing the OBC fixed the problem since my dealer was kind enough to swap out my LW for another one (which now has 1250 trouble free miles on it so far).


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